Gassy Balloon Science Show

Welcome to Camp Grandma’s Gassy Balloon Show, brought to you by my Science Guy Grandsons.  Nearby is Copper, our sulking grand-dog, since this project didn’t include snacks.
Camp Grandma Science Project Camp Grandma Science Project 1 Camp Grandma Science Project 3
Camp Grandma Science Project 2 Supplies needed:
Plastic Water Bottle
Vinegar
Baking Soda
Balloon
Funnel
Food Coloring (optional)

1). Pour 1/4 cup of Vinegar into an empty plastic Water Bottle.

2). Insert a Funnel into the Balloon.

3). Pour 1 Tablespoon of Baking Soda into the Balloon through the Funnel.

4). Remove the Funnel and carefully attach Balloon to the Water Bottle without letting any Baking Soda spill into the bottle.

5). Lift the Balloon up so the Baking Soda falls into the Bottle.

Now the fun begins!  Watch the balloon inflate.

My Science Guy’s project is a success.  The Vinegar and Baking Soda react when mixed and produce Carbon Dioxide gas.

This bubbling gas causes the balloon to inflate.

After the bubbling action stopped and the balloon deflated, the Science Guy’s were ready to add a few drops of food coloring to a fresh mixture.

This made for some interesting green bubbles that re-inflated the balloon.

How many times did my Science Guys try this project?

Hint: A quart of vinegar makes for a fun afternoon.

Isn’t science a gas?

My thanks to Life Is Peachy for this great science project idea.

A Good Day for Tortures and Beheadings at the Tower

Join me and my daughter as we travel back to a time when tortures and beheadings were executed in the Tower of London.
Tower of London Traitor Gate

We are in a boat with Anne Boleyn, Queen of England, headed for the Tower of London.  King Henry VIII is now in love with Jane Seymour, so some trumped up charge like treason is needed.  This doesn’t mean Anne has betrayed her country, just displeasing the king becomes her vile act of treason.

Anne’s boat enters the Tower of London through the Traitor’s gate and is met by the Constable of the Tower.  We hear her ask if she will be taken to a dungeon.  He assures her that she will be imprisoned in the same Royal apartments she had stayed in three years ago, when she became queen.
Tower of London Torture Rack Tower of London Beheading

The Tower received a ghastly reputation of innocent prisoners being tortured into confessing their guilt.  I noticed a somber mood fell over our group, as we read how bodies were stretched on the rack.

Tower of London Scaffolding site

The Spanish A-Frame successfully extracted confessions the opposite way by compressing the body.  I found it curious that these torture items were never destroyed, but I guess “what happens in the tower, stays in the tower.”

Let’s join Anne Boleyn again, as she hears that her sentence will be either burning or beheading.  King Henry VIII shows what a nice guy he is by selecting the quicker, less painful death.  English executioners didn’t get much practice hacking off heads, and needed several whacks to finally finish the bloody job.  As another act of kindness, an expert French swordsman with a sharpened sword is brought in to do the slicing.  We hear Anne commenting that fortunately “she has a little neck.”

The site of the scaffolding built for the beheadings is located on the Tower Green and marked by this crystal pillow.

My daughter and I weren’t very eager to test the rumors about ghosts haunting the Tower.  Supposedly, Anne Boleyn is sighted the most often as a headless body drifting near the Tower Green.  She has also been seen near the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula, where her bones were buried within the Tower.

I have never seen or felt the presence of apparitions, have you?

Want to win a great trip to Southern Oregon? Click here.

Crown Jewels and Heads Rolled in the Tower

Come along with me and my daughter to the Tower of London where heads rolled and Crown Jewels glitter.
Tower of London
Photographs are not allowed as we entered the vaulted, huge, two ton doorway. The phrase “all that glitters is not gold” came to mind, as my eyes took in this array of diamonds and gold displayed on velvet.

Tower of London Crown Jewel Door
What is on display? Basically all the glitz and sparkle that is used in coronations as British symbols of the ruling royalty.  Most of the collection is from the coronation of Charles II , when royalty was restored to England in 1661.

The long glass encasements are low enough to peer in from the top and then crouch to see from all sides. Since there are no queues to stagger the crowd, you can stand or walk at your pace. With no photography allowed, no one is jostling to get a better picture.

CSvBibra
British Imperial State Crown of George VI used for official functions, Photo by Wikimedia, CSvBibra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What happened to the earlier monarchy’s wealth?  Charles I  believed in the divine right of kings and triggered an English Civil War that lasted six years. Defeat also meant that the divine right to keep his head was permanently severed and Oliver Cromwell became the Lord Protector of England.

The monarchy was abolished, but the newly created English republic found itself in a desperate financial situation. In order to raise funds, the personal estate of the monarchy was sold to the highest bidder. Much of the gold was melted down and used for coins.

For Charles II coronation, many items were replicated. The oldest piece made by the royal goldsmiths that survived and was returned was a 12th century Coronation Spoon. Also the Coronation Chair was used for Cromwell’s installation as Lord Protector and never sold.

St. Edwards Crown, http://www.flickr.com/photos/bootbearwdc/

St. Edwards Crown used on coronation day, Photo by: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bootbearwdc/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Edward’s Crown is placed on the head of the new monarch by the archbishop on coronation day. This 1661 remake with 443 gems weighs five pounds and worn for only 20 minutes. The original was known to cause headaches for the newly crowned royalty, if worn too long.

England is steeped in superstitions, and the most famous diamond in the world is the Koh-i-Nur or “Mountain of Light”. It has only been set in crowns made for female members of the monarchy. “It is said to bring bad luck to any man who wears it, but is believed to bring long life and happiness to any woman who wears it.” Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, was 101 when she died, so this legend would seem to hold true.”

British Imperial Crown of India Photo by Wikipedia, CSvBibra

British Imperial Crown of India Photo by Wikipedia, CSvBibra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The only crown allowed to leave the country is the Imperial Crown of India. Set with more than 6000 diamonds, it was made especially for the Delhi Durbar in 1911 when George V was crowned Emperor of India.

It was overwhelming and difficult to comprehend all this glittering collection grouped in one room. There is very little description of each item, which keeps the crowds moving along quicker. One of the sceptres has the biggest cut diamond in the world, the 530-carat Star of Africa.

 

Queen Victoria and small diamond crown  Photo by Alexander Bassano, 1882

Queen Victoria and small diamond crown Photo by Alexander Bassano, 1882

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Queen Victoria’s tiny silver and diamond encrusted crown measures only 3.7 inches tall. It was designed to be worn over her mourning veil, following the death of her beloved husband, Prince Albert. Colored stones wouldn’t have seemed appropriate for wearing while in mourning. The 1,187 diamonds came from a necklace owned by Queen Victoria. After viewing such grand crowns, this coronet seemed so tiny and out of place in comparison.

The Crown Jewels were just a small part of our visit to the Tower of London. I could easily have spent another day absorbing this ongoing tradition of regalia, which aren’t just old, unused museum pieces. Should this collection of glitz and gold be replaced by fake gems or allowed to be photographed by tourists?

Take Fireworks Photos Like a Professional

Kari Sikorski, a professional photographer based in Salt Lake City, Utah, shares a guest post on how to capture amazing photos of Fireworks like a professional.  She takes all the guess work out of using a DSLR camera for you in this tutorial.

Firework Photography

by Kari Sikorski


The key is to have a long exposure and keep the camera steady.  Use a DSLR for the best results.

1. Use a Tripod:  Longer shutter speeds will not only capture the movement of the fireworks but any movement of the camera itself. The best way to keep your camera still is with a tripod.  

2. Remote Release: One way to ensure your camera is completely still during fireworks shots is to invest in a remote release device.


3. Framing Your Shot:  Scope out the location early – get a good, unobstructed position. Think about what is in the foreground and background of your shots and make sure you won’t have people’s heads in your shots (also consider what impact you’ll have on others around you also). Take note of where fireworks are being set up and what parts of the sky they are likely to be shot into.

  • Find Out the Direction of the Wind – You want to shoot up wind, so it goes Camera, Fireworks, Smoke. Otherwise the images will come out hazy. Make sure you are ready to take pictures of the first fireworks. If there isn’t much wind, you are going to end up with a lot of smoke in your shot as the show goes on. The first explosions are usually the sharpest ones.
  • Watch your Horizons - This is especially important if you’re going to shooting with a wide focal length and will get other background elements in your shots (ie a cityscape). Make sure your camera is level on your tripod.
  • Vertical or Horizontal?  Vertical works well because there is a lot of vertical motion in fireworks. Horizontal shots can work if you’re going for more of a landscape shot with a wider focal length or if you want to capture multiple bursts of fireworks in one shot.
  • Remember your framing – spend less time looking in the viewfinder and more time looking at the  sky. Doing this will also help you to anticipate the right time for a shot as you’ll see the light trails of unexploded rockets shooting into the sky.


4. Focal Length: I recommend using a zoom lens. Wide angle or zoomed in… experiment for variety.

5. ISO & Aperture: Set your ISO to 100 – fireworks are bright, and a low ISO has less noise/grain. Set your aperture to f/8.


6. Shutter Speed: Set the shutter speed to Bulb (B) setting. Bulb leaves the shutter open for as long as you depress the shutter release, and it’s a great way to make sure that you capture exactly what you see in the sky because you control when the exposure starts and stops. Hit the shutter as the firework is trailing up into the sky, and hold it down until it’s finished exploding (about 1-2 seconds).

Don’t keep your shutter open too long. fireworks are bright and it doesn’t take too much to over expose them, especially if your shutter is open for multiple bursts in the one area of the sky.

7. Switch off your Flash: If you’re using an SLR, simply lowering the flash and setting the camera to Manual mode will keep the flash from going off.


8. Manual Focus: If you leave your camera set to auto focus the lens will whir backwards and forwards trying to find something to focus on in the black sky and you’ll end up missing a lot of shots.

Set the lens to manual focus and set it to the ∞ (infinity) mark and leave it there. The fireworks will be far enough away that the camera would focus at infinity anyway.

9. Experiment and Check Results: Throughout the fireworks display occasionally check your results, but don’t check after every shot or you’ll miss the show.

When you’re shooting fireworks at night, the aperture controls the brightness of the lights, and the shutter speed determines how long the light trails appear in the photo.


If you want brighter fireworks, open the aperture by making the f number smaller (f5.6).

If the overall photo looks overexposed, make the f-number bigger (f11). Try again until you get an exposure you like.  Post-processing—darken the sky for increased contrast.


I asked Kari about her love of photography. This is her story about becoming a professional photographer: I have had a camera in my hands since I was about 7 years old. I grew up taking photographs of everything, and have a ridiculous amount of photo albums from my childhood which I cherish today. My dad first taught me how to shoot manually on his old 35mm that he carried in the Navy.

I am a mom to three adorable, loud, rambunctious boys, and photographing them gave me a new appreciation for what a photograph can mean to someone.

Check out her blog for the photos that have captured those smiles, milestones, relationships and special moments for her clients.

Travel By Hoof Power, Horse of Course

There are easier ways to travel, but families still love their three mile an hour horse power on the hoof.
Antelope Island Horse and Wagon
This covered wagon group travels through the western states each year. They converge on Antelope Island in Utah each summer during the annual Western Music Festival. The riders donate their time and covered wagons for local charity. As fellow horse lovers, we couldn’t resist the chance to go along for a ride down the dusty trail.
Antelope Island meeting wagon
They allowed me to ride shotgun with the driver, which seemed to give a very short proximity to the back side of the horse. Nell was harnessed close enough to me that she brushed the dust off my cowboy boots with her tail. I was so relieved that the horses didn’t need to add some fertilizer to the trail, or I’m sure that would have landed on my boots.
Antelope Island Covered Wagon
The driver explained what a day out on the road was like.  Although some of the group travels in motor homes, he keeps the heritage alive by camping as weather permits.  He described his morning as being awakened at dawn by the sounds of harnesses clanking and smelling coffee boiling.

The smile on his face while explaining that his average speed is three miles per hour, gave a sense of what I’m missing.  One of the tales he dispelled was the colorful phrase “circle the wagons” actually meant that the wagons served as a corral for the livestock.
Antelope Island riding shot gun
The towns along the way welcome them with organized guitar playing groups sitting around the evening campfires.  Other entertainment in the towns would include quilt and craft shows, toilet bowl races and cow pie bingo.

He admitted he’s feeling the old bones are telling him that riding on wagon trains may have to end soon.  His motto has been “as long as he is able to continue, this is an adventure that gives him a real appreciation for God, Country, and his pioneer ancestors that thrived on the western life.”

Memories of My Daddy’s Hand

Father’s Day is for letting our memories drift back to when we reached up to hold our daddy’s hand.

Traveling with Daddy, riding on a Toboggan
Traveling with Daddy on a wintry day, riding on a Toboggan

My Dad: These were times when I could share quiet walks with daddy, which was before noisy snowmobiles got us there quicker.  He was the strong, silent type that showed, rather than told me how to do things.  I earned a stern look when I did something not acceptable, which was louder than a lecture.

Dad always knew how to fix what was broken and I learned by watching. Yes, I could change a flat tire if I had too.

Daddy netting the Fish on Canadian Trip

Dad netting my record breaking 11 1/2 pound Walleyed Pike, on our family fishing trip in Canada

My Husband’s Dad:  Going fishing with dad was always a special time.  The experience of traveling to Canada for fishing Walleyes and Northern Pike was the trip of a lifetime.  Helping his son (my husband) bring in his fish was more important than catching that “big one” himself.

Our Dads knew that giving encouragement was so much better than giving criticism.

Retelling these wonderful experiences to our children, is the priceless legacy that will keep them alive forever in our memory.

This is an easy recipe that a very young chef, with some guidance, can make as a special treat for Father’s Day.

5.0 from 2 reviews
Chocolate Bread Pudding
 
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: 6
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
 
This bread pudding can be served warm or cold. Either Cinnamon-Raisin Bread or Cinnamon Bread can be used, depending on preference.
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon butter, plus more for baking dish
  • 8 slices (8 ounces) cinnamon or cinnamon-raisin bread
  • 2 cups milk
  • 3 ounces semi-sweet chocolate
  • 2 large eggs
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon confectioners powdered sugar
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Lightly butter an 11x7 inch (or 9-inch square) baking dish; set aside.
  3. Toast bread (in the oven or toaster) until lightly crisped.
  4. In a medium saucepan, combine milk, chocolate, and butter; place over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until chocolate has melted, about 5 minutes.
  5. Tear bread into large pieces (about 4 or 5 per slice); scatter evenly in prepared baking dish.
  6. In a medium bowl, wisk together eggs, granulated sugar, and vanilla.
  7. Wisk in warm milk mixture until combined.
  8. Pour over bread.
  9. Bake until pudding has puffed and is firm, about 25 minutes.
  10. Cool at least 10 minutes, and dust with confectioners powdered sugar just before serving.

May memories of your father’s love surround you with happiness on this Father’s Day too.

Past My Curfew is sharing his uniquely wonderful story for Father’s Day. Phoenix and his dad are celebrating a Cancer Free, second chance at enjoying each other’s company. Warning: Be sure to have a few tissues handy.

Vizcaya, an American Castle

Villa Vizcaya was built in Miami with a view of Biscayne Bay, although if appears to belong on the Mediterranean coast.
Vizcaya Gardens and Villa Vizcaya's Pool 21 Ornate Door - Copy Vizcaya Archway with family Vizcaya's GardensVizcaya BreakwaterView of Vizcaya from Breakwater Since America didn’t have castles built for kings and queens, the nation’s wealthy industrialists became America’s royalty and built their own lavish homes.

How better to flaunt their newly earned riches, than through extravagant displays of conspicuous lifestyles and mansions.

The early 1900’s gave optimism for becoming rich, whether by discovering gold, building bridges or inventing farm machinery.

James Deering, vice-president of International Harvestor Tractor Company, had a vision.

He desired a winter home that resembled a centuries-old Italian Renaissance villa.

The purchase of 180 acres of rural and unspoiled land in Miami, required his estate to be self-sufficient with a working farm.

Deering’s tractors thus contributed greatly to Florida’s agricultural farming success.

The workers were an international mix of nationalities, but learned quickly how to deal with mosquitos, crocs and snakes.

Since running to the local garden center wasn’t an option, they developed a new approach to horticulture in this hot and humid climate.

Local gardeners, familiar with the climate, knew how to incorporate native sub-tropical plants, as well as area rock, coral and limestone, in building the gardens.

James Deering was used to having his own way, so he chose an “up and coming” architect that would let him have the fun of designing his dream home.

Together they traveled to Pompeii, Italy, as well as other European countries to purchase 15th through 19th century furnishings and art.

The villa took two years to complete, but work continued on the gardens from 1910 until 1923.

The many fountains, statuary, pool and themed gardens were modeled after Italian and French designs.

The golden age of splendor was coming to a close when Deering died in 1925 at the age of 65.

Hurricane damage and the “Great Depression” made the home a white elephant for his heirs.

The breakwater was carved out of Florida limestone to create the fantasy of a Venetian barge with decorative sculpture and numerous live plants.

Of the 180 acres, only 50 acres of gardens and the main estate were kept intact.  They were generously donated to the Miami-Dade County as a condition that Vizcaya would be used as a public museum.  The heirs also donated the entire 15th through 19th century furnishings and art.

I wish we would have been allowed to take photos inside the villa, to show you the lavishly decorated rooms.  Fortunately Vizcaya’s website can guide you through this beautiful villa.

Visiting Vizcaya gave us the chance to imagine what it was like to live in this gilded era.  We walked through his many rooms, filled with ancient artifacts, instead of viewing them in some stuffy, gallery type museum.

What name would you bestow on your dream home?